goal 6

Canada: 11th OUT OF 41 COUNTRIES

 « PROMOTE SUSTAINED, INCLUSIVE AND SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH, FULL AND PRODUCTIVE EMPLOYMENT AND DECENT WORK FOR ALL »

TARGET 8.5
Achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men.


PARENT PARTICIPATION IN THE LABOUR MARKET

  • In Quebec in 2011, according to the most recent available data, employment rates for people aged 25–54 with at least one child under the age of six was 88.6% for men and 73.6% for women (Table 6.1).
  • Employment rates for women with young children have increased considerably over the last 35 years, and as a result, the gap between male and female employment has strongly decreased.
  • A comparison of parents’ employment rates in the regions that make up Greater Montréal shows that significant regional differences exist: in Montréal, the number of women and men aged 25–54 with at least one child under six and who hada paid job was lower than the numbers for Quebec overall and for Laval and Montérégie.
  • Living as a couple or being a lone parent also had a significant impact on parents’ employment rates. In all regions, lone-parent mothers had lower employmentrates than mothers who were part of a couple. The same was true for men.

TABLE 6.1

Employment rate for people aged 25–54, living in a household with at least one child under the age of six, by sex and family situation, for all of Quebec, and for Montréal, Laval and Montérégie, 2011.

SOURCE: Statistics Canada, 2011 Census data, as reported in: Conseildu statut de la femme (2015). Portrait statistique : Égalité Femmes —
Hommes (Montréal, Laval et Montérégie)

WOMEN

MEN

WORK-FAMILY BALANCE IS A BIG CHALLENGE

  • According to l’Observatoire des tout-petits, in 2014 in Quebec, 129,190 parents benefitted from Quebec’s parental insurance plan—up 25% from 2006. This increase was especially pronounced among fathers, with a 57%, hike, as compared to 6% for mothers.
  • According to the 2015 Québec Survey on the Experience of Parents of Children Aged 0 to 5, 54% of Montréal parents said they “never or rarely” felt they had enough free time for themselves; the percentage was 55% for Quebec overall.
  • 20% of Montréal parents said they “often or always” felt they lack time for their children—a lower percentage than the proportion of 25% for Quebec overall.

TARGET 8.6
By 2020, substantially reduce the proportion of youth not in employment, education or training.


OUT-OF-SCHOOL YOUTH

IN QUEBEC IN 2013–2016, THERE WERE 1,487,500 YOUNG PEOPLE
AGED 15–29. A LITTLE OVER 800,000, OR 54% OF THEM, WERE
NO LONGER IN SCHOOL.

  • Of the approximately 800,000 youth who were no longer in school, 186,800 were considered “neither enrolled nor employed” (NEET), meaning they did not have a job and did not attend
    school or a training program.

    In other words, in 2013–2016 in Quebec, 12% of youth aged 15–29 were neither working nor attending school or a training program.

    Of the 186,800 NEET youth: 17% were aged 15–19, 38% were aged 20–24, and 45% were aged 25-29.
  • Of the youth aged 15–29 who were no longer in school, 9% did not have
    a secondary school diploma (DES).

    This is an improvement over 1992–1995 when 15% of youth were out of school
    and without a secondary school diploma.

    In the rest of Canada, the rates were lower than in Quebec: 12% in 1992–1995 and 6% in 2013–2016.

    The rates in Quebec and Canada are lower than the average rates observed in OECD countries.

WORK, HEALTH AND SCHOOL DROP OUT RATES

  • According to the 2010–2011 Québec Health Surveyof High School Students, 15% of secondary school students who had a paid job during their studies reported having a high level of psychological distress, without however reporting having been diagnosed with anxiety or depression.

    This percentage was higher among students working 16 or more hours per week (27%), as compared to 20% among those working under 11 hours a week or those who did not have paid work.

    This applied to both boys and girls, but was more pronounced among girls.
  • Among youth in secondary school, 21% of boys working 1–10 hours per week showed a high risk of dropping out of school. This proportion was 41% in those working over 21 hours. For girls, these percentages were 13% et 24%, respectively.